Why no farewell from LOTSW?

Moonraker

Well-Known Member
Ok, so I just finished watching the last episode of LOTSW: series 32 titled 'How Not to Cry at a Wedding.' I had never seen this episode before. As I started watching the programme I was thinking about what the final scene would be like. Ideas that came to mind included: watery eyes on set; a raise of glasses directed at the audience; even perhaps a "that's all folks, like when Phil Silvers addressed the audience in the final show at the end."
The final scene was a bus full of the cast been driven away, though Clegg did have the last word.
I was a bit disappointed, but then thought perhaps another series was commissioned but never materialised, so the cast were unaware of their fate.
 

Pearl

Administrator
Staff member
I don't think the show was ever sentimental, it's not the way Roy writes. The only cast member the show went over board about losing was Bill Owen, others came and went and half the time we never knew what happened to them, it was like they dropped off the face of the planet. We never heard about Smiler, Billy or Roz again. I liked the fact there was no fanfare just a quiet ride off into the sunset like they'd be back in a few hours drunk and falling over the cat.
 

maltrab

Administrator
Staff member
I was there on the last days of filming, and there was no buzz going round that this would be the end, so pleased I managed to be in the final,even though it's hard to see me as I was in a back room of the pub with several others, in fact where I was they put Frank and Peter imposed as if they were there, same as they did with them sitting in the back of the coach, which they were not
 

MoodyBlue

Dedicated Member
I think one of the real charms that attracts us to "our show" is the quirkyness,and unpredictability within each episode.....
Apart from Compo's sad passing I agree with Pearl in that he has never felt the need to be over sentimental........excess sentiment may detract from his brilliantly written plots,twists and turns.
I feel "our show" has always been understated.....it never "courted" appeal or praise.......it just grew on you.
A big finale would have maent we would not have the wonderful instinct to think..." I wonder if Marina/Miss Davenport found true love and happiness......I wonder if Hobbo WAS in the secret service...etc...etc...etc....."
The magic happened...when nothing really seemed to be happening.......
 

Barrychuckle

Dedicated Member
I thought at the time of filming the last series it wasn't a fait accompli that the series was going to end so I always thought that was the reason there wasn't a fanfare. I'm sure Alan Bell says in his book that he was hopeful of the BBC commissioning a further series whilst he was filming this series?
 

Sarkus

Dedicated Member
I was there on the last days of filming, and there was no buzz going round that this would be the end, so pleased I managed to be in the final,even though it's hard to see me as I was in a back room of the pub with several others, in fact where I was they put Frank and Peter imposed as if they were there, same as they did with them sitting in the back of the coach, which they were not
Thats interesting because Andrew Vine in his book says that many of the people involved assumed it was the end. Roy Clarke has defended the final episode as being what he wanted to end with so I can't really get too unhappy about it. Personally I've always suspected that the show continuing on another network may have been viewed as a possibility (Alan Bell says there was serious talk about it but is careful to say that talk happened after the BBC announced they were ending the show).
 
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