Turkey shortage solution. Gobble gobble.

Adanor

Dedicated Member
I don't need to worry about the turkey shortage, I'm gonna treat myself to TWO whole slices of beans on toast on Christmas day :01:
Let's note some facts about turkeys. The way they are bred, they cannot (ahem) procreate naturally so they need a little (ahem) help. Unless they are organic, possibly they never will have the opportunity to experience the great outdoors. Beans on toast is looking better and better.
 

Eithne

Dedicated Member
I'm surprised the turkeys aren't responsible for their own shortage. I knew a man who got a desperate call at work from his sister during a rainstorm because they had left the turkeys outside and they were all standing out there watching the rain fall and drowning. They had to process half the flock in a hurry to save the meat.
 

Barrychuckle

Dedicated Member
I was listening to some sort of turkey expert on the wireless on this subject the other day, apparently it's not going to be as bad as some are predicting. They say most of the market is frozen which isn't affected and they can somehow bring forward turkey supplies which were to be used in the new year. As I'm off to Norway over Christmas I'll probably be having reindeer which is their staple Christmas food!
 

captain clutterbuck

LOTSW Fanatic
I know its a staple and must have but unless you buy a really high quality free range bird [2nd Mortgage required] then I don't think it could be any blander and tasteless there are so many far better options, even the skinheads on rafts that Tony is having has more taste. I never understand the clamour associated with people making sure 100% they have a Turkey lined up and the panic when a shortage is expected.
 

captain clutterbuck

LOTSW Fanatic
It doesn't look much like the Works Christmas party meal I remember, though the cost to Smiler and Tom is probably up there with the upmarket Restaurant prices at this time of year.
 

Marianna

Dedicated Member
It’s the way they’re killed that keeps me away
When I was a child on the farm (in the late 1940s and early '50s), we didn't raise turkeys, but we'd frequently cull the flock of laying hens. From the time I could toddle, whenever my father was about to kill a turkey for the next day's dinner, he invite me to watch. He'd lay in on the chopping block, then cut off it's head with the axe. Then we'd watch it run around, the proverbial "chicken with it's head cut off", until it collapsed. I enjoyed watching that more than I enjoyed the next day's meal, bloodthirsty kid! The culled hens were always so old that the only way to make them edible was to stew them. The only parts with any flavor were the thigh and drumstick.

Same with turkey, for my taste - only thighs and drumsticks are worth eating. I live in a region of New York State where there are some organic farmers, some of whom raise turkeys, so when you take into account all the fat that comes off an ordinary turkey when it's cooked, the price per pound isn't that much higher.
 

onyx(John)

Administrator
Staff member
When I was a child on the farm (in the late 1940s and early '50s), we didn't raise turkeys, but we'd frequently cull the flock of laying hens. From the time I could toddle, whenever my father was about to kill a turkey for the next day's dinner, he invite me to watch. He'd lay in on the chopping block, then cut off it's head with the axe. Then we'd watch it run around, the proverbial "chicken with it's head cut off", until it collapsed. I enjoyed watching that more than I enjoyed the next day's meal, bloodthirsty kid! The culled hens were always so old that the only way to make them edible was to stew them. The only parts with any flavor were the thigh and drumstick.

Same with turkey, for my taste - only thighs and drumsticks are worth eating. I live in a region of New York State where there are some organic farmers, some of whom raise turkeys, so when you take into account all the fat that comes off an ordinary turkey when it's cooked, the price per pound isn't that much higher.
I'm worried about you now Marianna :p
 

Marianna

Dedicated Member
I'm worried about you now Marianna :p
Not to worry.

I turned myself into a townie as soon as I had learned a marketable skill. Now the farm experience seems almost as though it belonged to someone else, except that all of my first and second cousins on my father's side lived exactly the same experience, and they still talk about it.
 
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