The White Horse Inn at Jackson Bridge

WesleyRocks

Dedicated Member
As I was just saying .... I am a 70-year-old geezer, been driving on the
US side of the road since about 1958, been driving a manual tranny since
about 1959. First trip to the UK took a bit of adjustment, but since
then we do this every year. Sometimes down in the west country, but
mostly up in Yorkshire. No probs other than a flat tire once or twice,
but the rental car guyz send a van around to fix those.
That is good information. I was reading a blog of an American who worked in the UK for a few months and he said the first time you almost have a head on collision you learn very quickly.
I agree with the manual. Love them!
I went to purchase a truck this year and I wanted a manual, there were only 2 in the entire US of the make and model I wanted. Crazy.
Where I work as a mechanic, we still have carburetors. Only 2 of us out of the 25 employees here understand the whole CHOKE idea and when to use it. However, on the other side of it, it keeps me employed changing fouled spark plugs ::)
 

Adanor

Dedicated Member
As I was just saying .... I am a 70-year-old geezer, been driving on the
US side of the road since about 1958, been driving a manual tranny since
about 1959. First trip to the UK took a bit of adjustment, but since
then we do this every year. Sometimes down in the west country, but
mostly up in Yorkshire. No probs other than a flat tire once or twice,
but the rental car guyz send a van around to fix those.
That is good information. I was reading a blog of an American who worked in the UK for a few months and he said the first time you almost have a head on collision you learn very quickly.
I agree with the manual. Love them!
I went to purchase a truck this year and I wanted a manual, there were only 2 in the entire US of the make and model I wanted. Crazy.
Where I work as a mechanic, we still have carburetors. Only 2 of us out of the 25 employees here understand the whole CHOKE idea and when to use it. However, on the other side of it, it keeps me employed changing fouled spark plugs ::)
Speaking of chokes, back in the early '60's my family was on a trip and my father could not get the 52 Ford started, so Cousin Bob very gently eased his car up so that the bumpers touched, then he revved up his engine and our car started. OK, before anyone tells, that was way off topic.
 

cciaffone

Dedicated Member
Speaking of chokes, back in the early '60's my family was on a trip and my father could not get the 52 Ford started, so Cousin Bob very gently eased his car up so that the bumpers touched, then he revved up his engine and our car started. OK, before anyone tells, that was way off topic.
huh?? not sure i understand this. what did touching bumpers have to
do with starting a 52 ford???
 

WesleyRocks

Dedicated Member
bump starting?
That's what I'm thinking????
I learned to drive on a 51 ford truck 3 on the tree. flat head v8, push button floor starter. Loved that truck. That was in the 80's, my dad kept that truck for a long time. Rust eventually did it in.
He used to have a special parking spot at work (on a hill) at work so he could bump start it.
 

barmpot

LOTSW Fanatic
No stranger to the odd bump start - although no good these days as I have a diesel .....

But also recall bump starting motor cycles - when kick start was inoperable as a 2/6 spring had failed* - pushing along in gear (second worked best) with clutch lever in and then when a bit of speed letting clutch out and hoped it fired and as it went swing leg over and settle down - probably totally against H & S these days.

*Common problem on the old BSA Bantam D1 - it would be £10 to split crankcase and fit spring and replace everything so just ignored! :( :( :me: :me:
 

gremlin

Dedicated Member
haha, yes we are well off topic, but seeing we are I remember my first two cars, an Austin 1100 and a first series capri...apart from the fact they rotted to hell I spent many hours under the bonnet or under the car....got a Nissan note now, not easy to work on seeing they are all computerized, but then you don't need to....and they don't rot!!!!
 

cciaffone

Dedicated Member
well i do drive a 1972 MG Midget.

So I am very familiar with the JUMP start. Have to do it sometimes ;D ;D

But I still do not get the bump start. You actually ram one vehicle
into another, sort of a violent push start?? (With my Midget,
you don't need that much to push-start it either.)
 

maltrab

Administrator
Staff member
well i do drive a 1972 MG Midget.

So I am very familiar with the JUMP start. Have to do it sometimes ;D ;D

But I still do not get the bump start. You actually ram one vehicle
into another, sort of a violent push start?? (With my Midget,
you don't need that much to push-start it either.)
When I was a lad it was often the case I needed help to bump start the car,get a couple of friends or even passers by to start pushing the car,get a little bit of speed up,ignition on,maybe 2nd gear selected,once speed is built up,drop the clutch and with luck the car would burst into life,in fact one car I had I knew it would never start and always left it parked on a hill,and normally at the same time each morning the same folk would push it down hill,and away it would go,I have never used another car to push it along,don't think the bumpers would take the strain,the other option would be a tow start
 

barmpot

LOTSW Fanatic
One rescue organisation gave me a tow start on a garage forecourt in the late 1990s when my battery hadfailed!
 

chris

Dedicated Member
One way I used was to put in second gear and then someone gave me a shove always worked cars in sixties and seventies were very unreliable engine and bodywise.Morris Marina,s especialy were awful .It always seemed that you saw someone stopped bonnet up greasy hands looking frustrated .
 

barmpot

LOTSW Fanatic
One way I used was to put in second gear and then someone gave me a shove always worked cars in sixties and seventies were very unreliable engine and bodywise. Morris Marina,s especially were awful .It always seemed that you saw someone stopped bonnet up greasy hands looking frustrated .

Agree the Marina had rough bodywork although the engine of one I had was fast. It was a series B 1800 TC (as used in the MGB) and returned about 18 mpg. The other snag that was after prolonged running at 30 mph the engine was prone to over-heat and I once in the 1980s had to nearly stop on the North Circular but then a stretch appeared where I could get up to 40 mph and the engine cooled down!

Such fun :-X :-X :-X
 

WesleyRocks

Dedicated Member
I love these stories! !! I've wanted a moris minor, there are a few here in the states, but they are a little out of my price range at this time, and im not sure i would fit. Kind of a big guy. Not sure now i want one listening to you guys :D
I liked the look of them.
Ive been in an MG, my head stuck out the top 8)
 

maltrab

Administrator
Staff member
I had several Ford Anglia's in the 60-70's they were all the same colour,two tone,mud and rust and all of them had sunshine floors
 

WesleyRocks

Dedicated Member
I had several Ford Anglia's in the 60-70's they were all the same colour,two tone,mud and rust and all of them had sunshine floors
sunshine floors? What is that?
Is what you call holes in the floor of the car. Instead of having a sunshine roof. You have a sunshine floor. :)
I thought that might be what it was. I had a truck with a sunshine shine bed then :D, we had a piece of plywood in the bed so you wouldn't fall through. Once the seat started leaning my dad got rid of it.
 
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