The White Horse Inn at Jackson Bridge

WesleyRocks

Well-Known Member
Looks like the place to stay if we ever get a chance to visit. The inside looks very nice!
Now for all those folks who live near Holmfirth or visit. How tough of a walk would that be to Holmfirth? Or would that be a bus ride? I looked at it on google maps and it is about 1.7 miles but I wasn't sure if you had walking paths that would be more direct.
Just curious
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
It's a very easy walk between Holmfirth and Jackson Bridge
on a sidewalk (pavement?), and a really easy walk
from Jackson Bridge over to The Butcher's Arms in
Hepworth. We often start in H'firth, stop at the pub in
Scholes (boot and shoe) then down into JB to The
White Horse, then over to the Butcher's Arms -- having a
dark ale in each pub. Then back thru Wooldale stopping
at the Wooldale Arms.

We prefer to actually stay in Holmfirth because there is so
much available there (shops, pubs, B&Bs, etc) and walk from
centrally-located H'firth to places like JB, Marsden, and
Holme.
 

WesleyRocks

Well-Known Member
It's a very easy walk between Holmfirth and Jackson Bridge
on a sidewalk (pavement?), and a really easy walk
from Jackson Bridge over to The Butcher's Arms in
Hepworth. We often start in H'firth, stop at the pub in
Scholes (boot and shoe) then down into JB to The
White Horse, then over to the Butcher's Arms -- having a
dark ale in each pub. Then back thru Wooldale stopping
at the Wooldale Arms.

We prefer to actually stay in Holmfirth because there is so
much available there (shops, pubs, B&Bs, etc) and walk from
centrally-located H'firth to places like JB, Marsden, and
Holme.
That makes sense, staying in Holmfirth, I just thought it would be a "How cool" moment to stay at the White Horse. Then when we have friends over and such, we show them LOTSW and we can say "we stayed there" type thing.
I guess I'm a goober like that ;D
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
We usually stay at the Springfield House B&B right on the
main drag (Huddersfield Road). But there is also the Old
Bridge Hotel, Ash House, and Elephant and Castle.
 

Dennisbn514

Well-Known Member
Chuck, I envy you being able to visit all the great sights and pubs of LOTSW. When you go to a pub, do you use credit cards to pay or the local currency? I must admit that I have no idea how the British monetary system is set up.
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
We land at Heathrow and immediately use our ATM cards
to take out several hundred pounds of cash right away.
We then use cash mostly, certainly always at pubs and
such. I believe that we use credit cards only when
fueling the rented car.

There are ATMs all over Yorkshire. But before you leave
the US, you gotta call the ATM card folks and be sure it will
work in the UK. And the time difference may be critical.
I have sometimes landed in the UK and found my ATM card
won't work ... till the next day. Remember the time difference.
 

WesleyRocks

Well-Known Member
We land at Heathrow and immediately use our ATM cards
to take out several hundred pounds of cash right away.
We then use cash mostly, certainly always at pubs and
such. I believe that we use credit cards only when
fueling the rented car.

There are ATMs all over Yorkshire. But before you leave
the US, you gotta call the ATM card folks and be sure it will
work in the UK. And the time difference may be critical.
I have sometimes landed in the UK and found my ATM card
won't work ... till the next day. Remember the time difference.
Chuck, this is some very good information. I have a question now that you mentioned rental car. How hard is it to get used to driving on the "correct" ;D side of the road? I'd be a nervous wreck (no pun intended there). I always think if I make it over there to stick with public transportation, for my safety as well as everyone else's.
Thank for the insight, maybe we need to start a new thread about traveling to England for us Yanks.
Darin
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
Have to admit, first time over, getting the car in London and
driving out was no fun. Kept hitting the left front wheel cover
on bridge drains. Soon cured, and have done fine since.

Gotta watch it on the narrow roads and strange junctions
up in Yorkshire tho. Have had a few problems with oncoming
traffic but no accidents. Now, some years later, no probs at all!!

It's not just the "wrong side" so much as the really REALLY narrow
roads up North. Still, love doing it and will do it again even at
my advanced years.
 

Big Unc

Well-Known Member
Chuck, this is some very good information. I have a question now that you mentioned rental car. How hard is it to get used to driving on the "correct" ;D side of the road? I'd be a nervous wreck (no pun intended there). I always think if I make it over there to stick with public transportation, for my safety as well as everyone else's.
Thank for the insight, maybe we need to start a new thread about traveling to England for us Yanks.
Darin
Make sure you book an automatic. They are far less common than in the US and must be specified with a rental company.

And, speaking from Scotland, please ensure you use term UK or Britain unless you are talking very specifically and uniquely about England.
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
No! No! No! You do NOT want a slush box!

You want a manual transmission, clutch and all. We been driving
4/5 speeds for decades. You have more control, more feel. Especially
in Yorkshire where roads can evaporate in seconds as you crest a
steep climb (as in the hills above Askrigg).
 

Big Unc

Well-Known Member
No! No! No! You do NOT want a slush box!

You want a manual transmission, clutch and all. We been driving
4/5 speeds for decades. You have more control, more feel. Especially
in Yorkshire where roads can evaporate in seconds as you crest a
steep climb (as in the hills above Askrigg).
Haven't a clue what you mean here. Both cars are now automatics. It's an age thing. Haven't driven a manual for around two years. If in US driving on the other side of the road do not want distraction of gear-changing. And Yorkshire roads have nothing in difficulty compared with Scotland's.
 

barmpot

Well-Known Member
And, speaking from Scotland, please ensure you use term UK or Britain unless you are talking very specifically and uniquely about England.
And I believe that Britain excludes Northern Ireland, whereas UK includes it. England is often used interchangeably with Britain but I am with Big U here - they are not.

For one view on this see the Flanders and Swann song "The English are best"

http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/English.htm

 

Big Unc

Well-Known Member
And I believe that Britain excludes Northern Ireland, whereas UK includes it. England is often used interchangeably with Britain but I am with Big U here - they are not.

For one view on this see the Flanders and Swann song "The English are best"

http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/English.htm
I would suggest to be strictly correct, Great Britain (which is the largest of the British Isles) does not include Northern Ireland. The UK is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

I have a feeling that the term 'Britain' geographically is a region including the British Isles, (Great Britain and the whole of Ireland) plus Brittany. But, of course, I could be lying.

And I love Flanders and Swann.
 

chris

Well-Known Member
How long before its England ,Scotland ,Wales ,N Ireland all separate and going in different directions ,progress?
 

chris

Well-Known Member
But the White Horse looks rather nice hope they are successful so different to how used to look.
 

gremlin

Well-Known Member
hi chris, this devolution will only go so far...much as many hearts in the uk would like to see it the fact of the matter is that we are a small country to begin with and full independence for each part is just not practically viable...but I do stand to be judged wrong, just my opinion.
As for driving on the "wrong side of the road". well i'm often running over between france and the uk...was filled with trepidation the first time but was amazed just how amazingly quick I adapted...like immediately....everything is just opposite and so really its very easy, especially when you consider all of the road signage is there to help whichever side of the road you are on....don't let it put you guys from across the pond from hiring a car when you get here. Granted, some roads in the countryside, off the beaten track, can be a bit narrow but care and common sense is the simple order of the day. As for automatic cars, have had one for the last three years, getting older and lazy, but love it.....and yes specify you want automatic or you are likely to be suppied with a manual... :)
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
As I was just saying .... I am a 70-year-old geezer, been driving on the
US side of the road since about 1958, been driving a manual tranny since
about 1959. First trip to the UK took a bit of adjustment, but since
then we do this every year. Sometimes down in the west country, but
mostly up in Yorkshire. No probs other than a flat tire once or twice,
but the rental car guyz send a van around to fix those.
 

wstol

Well-Known Member
It looks lovely, wasn't expecting the interior to look like that, the pub is on my 'to do' list :D
The interior did look the same as in the shows - in some episodes they filmed inside the actual pub, other episodes had a studio set built which was fairly accurate.

Though the new renovations are nice, it's lost it's summer wine look.
 
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