Tea Time questions.

Pearl

Super Moderator
Staff member
Being friends with several Americans I've come to realise our eating habits are very different.
 

JBCat

Well-Known Member
I'd never heard of a Tin Roof Sundae but having looked it up, it sounds absolutely delicious.
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
The Tin Roof Sundae is a standard flavor in many of our "boxed" ice creams
we get from a "large" stores like Aldi or Food Lion, big stores that
carry pretty much everything..
 

Marianna

Well-Known Member
The Tin Roof Sundae is a standard flavor in many of our "boxed" ice creams
we get from a "large" stores like Aldi or Food Lion, big stores that
carry pretty much everything..
Back in the '50s, any sundae was a DIY project, usually a simplified version of the soda fountain creation. My father made his with store brand vanilla ice cream, ditto chocolate sauce and salted redskin peanuts.
 

captain clutterbuck

Well-Known Member
We in the UK have a Knickerbocker Glory which I guess is the same . Where I live there is an Ice Cream parlour that has been selling Ice Cream for over 100 years and in there is its sadly known as the divorced dad's Sunday special because Sunday was the designated day that Divorced dads saw their kids and they always took them to this parlour for the biggest ice cream as a treat.


ice cream.jpg
 

captain clutterbuck

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the link Rick no not a great deal of difference between a Tin Roof Sundae and a Brit Knickerbocker Glory . Is there a story as to why it was named a "Tin Roof" Sundae why Tin Roof ? Thanks in advance for any explanation.
 

RickAns

Well-Known Member
I had to look up on wiki to trace the origins of the name. Seems around the 1890's ice cream soda shops were gaining in popularity. Some places around the U.S. had 'blue laws' banning soda from being served on Sundays as being 'too frilly'. So the soda shops got a creative work around and served up interesting ice cream combinations without the soda by using different flavored syrups instead.

One variation says a Mr. Sonntag from from Plainfield, Illinois created the first dish at the urging of his patrons wanting something different. His German last name meaning Sunday in English was transferred to Sundae as the name of his new dish.

The Tin Roof Sundae was created in Potter, Nebraska and named after either the tin roof on their building or the stable across the street. Interesting how ice cream / soda shops seemed to have started in pharmacies and drug stores.
 

Pearl

Super Moderator
Staff member
It's weird how what laws where made and a lot of them are still in effect. I think I read somewhere once that it was against the law to buy a bible on a Sunday but you could quite legally buy pornography!
 

RickAns

Well-Known Member
Captain, I can imagine Benny Hill having some fun with the Knickerbocker Glory name in a skit.
Pearl, there are some bizarre laws that really need to be purged from the books.
 

captain clutterbuck

Well-Known Member
I would expect that Benny would have used in one of his many shows without doubt . There is another comedian noted for his one liner jokes that Dick would be proud to deliver most of which draw groans . He is Tim Vine and I think he holds some sort of record for the number of jokes told in an hour or something like that .Just to give you a flavour here are a few and he has indeed included one about the said dessert.

“I’d like to start with the chimney jokes – I’ve got a stack of them. The first one is on the house.”

“This policeman came up to me with a pencil and a piece of very thin paper. He said, ‘I want you to trace someone for me.'”

“I saw this advert in a window that said: ‘Television for sale, £1, volume stuck on full.’ I thought, ‘I can’t turn that down.'”

“I went down my local ice-cream shop, and said ‘I want to buy an ice-cream’. He said ‘Hundreds & thousands?’ I said ‘We’ll start with one.’ He said ‘Knickerbocker glory?’ I said ‘I do get a certain amount of freedom in these trousers, yes.'”

:tw::fp::fp:
 
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