Something unusual about the area you live in

WellyMan

Dedicated Member
To UK forumites here's a cheeky question. I write magazine articles and am always looking for new ideas that I may be able to write about. Is there anything unusual about the area you live in?
 

MoodyBlue

Dedicated Member
Here we go !!!!....
My city was founded by King John [a.k.a. The Villain in Robin Hood !!]....
The 7 mile Docks is the largest in the world....
The "£10 to Australia" offer started here....
St Johns Gardens has 82000 people buried there...
The world's only slavery museum is here.....
Charles Dickens was sworn in as a police officer here.....
Our most famous street used to be a fruit and veg market....
Our most famous club had no fire exit....and no alcohol licence...
We have the largest open air shopping centre in Europe......Welcome to Liverpool my fellow Summerwiners !!!!!.
Keith.
X!
 

Barrychuckle

Dedicated Member
The modern Olympics started in Shropshire, one of the 2012 London mascots was called Wenlock named after Much Wenlock where this happened.
The Prototype skyscraper was first built in Shrewsbury, its the flax mill and is currently been renovated.
Market Drayton is where gingerbread originated from
Newport recorded the coldest ever temperature in the UK minus 26 in 1982!!!
The British Hedgehog Preservation society is based here
Shrewsbury has the tallest MP in parliament

And most famously.............

Foggy Dewhurst was billeted here - Oswestry!!!!
 

maltrab

Administrator
Staff member
The first policewoman to be granted full powers of arrest in Great Britain 100 years ago
English mathematician and physicist Sir Isaac Newton was born in a manor house at Woolsthorpe, near Grantham
Stamford was the first conservation area to be designated in England and Wales in 1967
Long Sutton was home to Dick Turpin for around nine months in 1737, when the notorious highwayman sought refuge away from London.
Pinchbeck's Key Market store (where Morrison's now stands) was chosen to host the historic moment when the country's first barcode - on a packet of Melrose teabags - was scanned back in October 1979.
RAF officer and engineer Frank Whittle invented jet travel in the heavily-guarded secrecy of RAF Cranwell, at Sleaford.
Lincoln's contribution to modern warfare was the invention of the tank. Built by William Foster & Co during the First World War
RAF Scampton is also home to the world-famous RAF Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows, which has been displaying since 1965.

And to top it all I live in Lincolnshire, which must be the flattest I have ever lived
 

WellyMan

Dedicated Member
The first policewoman to be granted full powers of arrest in Great Britain 100 years ago
English mathematician and physicist Sir Isaac Newton was born in a manor house at Woolsthorpe, near Grantham
Stamford was the first conservation area to be designated in England and Wales in 1967
Long Sutton was home to Dick Turpin for around nine months in 1737, when the notorious highwayman sought refuge away from London.
Pinchbeck's Key Market store (where Morrison's now stands) was chosen to host the historic moment when the country's first barcode - on a packet of Melrose teabags - was scanned back in October 1979.
RAF officer and engineer Frank Whittle invented jet travel in the heavily-guarded secrecy of RAF Cranwell, at Sleaford.
Lincoln's contribution to modern warfare was the invention of the tank. Built by William Foster & Co during the First World War
RAF Scampton is also home to the world-famous RAF Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows, which has been displaying since 1965.

And to top it all I live in Lincolnshire, which must be the flattest I have ever lived
That's a good point about Frank Whittle and William Foster so something I might be able to write about for Lincolnshire Life. We recently moved to this county and it's even flatter than Wiltshire where we were before.
 

maltrab

Administrator
Staff member
That's a good point about Frank Whittle and William Foster so something I might be able to write about for Lincolnshire Life. We recently moved to this county and it's even flatter than Wiltshire where we were before.
I think it is only Cambridgeshire that is a flatter county
 

captain clutterbuck

LOTSW Fanatic
I am from Newcastle so here a number of facts

Newcastle shares its latitude with Copenhagen, Denmark and southern Sweden.

The city is believed to be the coldest major city in England, but it is also one of the driest cities in the UK, due to being in the rain shadow of the North Pennines.

Newcastle Central Station was the first covered train station in the world and it was opened in 1850 by none other than Queen Victoria herself. Believe you or not, before that all passengers had to brave the elements while they waited for their train. The foundation stone is dated 1849 the date the High Level Bridge opened and allowed passengers to cross the river . Previously they got off the trains on the other bank and crossed by boat.

Newcastle was the filming location for 1971 gangster movie Get Carter and 1988 noir thriller Stormy Monday.

At 929 acres, Newcastle Town Moor is larger than most parks in London, including Hyde Park (363 acres) and Hampstead Heath (790 acres).

Mosley Street was the first street in the world to be illuminated by electric light.

Newcastle has seven bridges crossing the river in the space of half a mile. Tyne Bridge is said to have inspired Sydney Harbour Bridge in Australia; High Level Bridge was the first in the world to combine road and rail;

The Lit and Phil Library, formally known as the Literary and Philosophical Society of Newcastle upon Tyne, is the largest independent library outside London and it houses more than 150,000 books!

St James Park, the home of Newcastle United, is one of the oldest football stadiums in the UK and it is located right in the heart of the city.

At 73 miles long, Hadrian’s Wall is one of the largest Roman artefacts still standing today. It is also a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Newcastle Brown Ale is a proud produce of Newcastle, but it is also America’s most imported British Ale![Though its no longer brewed in the city]

Energy and sports drink Lucozade was invented in Newcastle by chemist William Owen.

Guitarist Jimi Hendrix was not only discovered by Geordie producer Chas Chandler, he also busked in Heaton Chillingham Road and had a Fish supper in Tynemouth.

George Stephenson, the ‘Father of Railways’, was a Geordie.

Originally a settlement called Pons Aelius, Newcastle was later named after the Roman fort that once stood at its centre.

RMS Carpathia, the boat that rescued Titanic survivors, was built in a River Tyne shipyard, in Newcastle.

The faithful windscreen wiper was invented in Newcastle by a Newcastle United fan as he drove home in a storm from a cup final match in 1908.

The city has its very own Vampire in the form of a Rabbit.

The North East has the greatest variety of ginger hair in the world! There are 47 shades of red hotness around the Tyne.


rabbit.jpg

IMG_4057.JPG
 

WellyMan

Dedicated Member
Here we go !!!!....
My city was founded by King John [a.k.a. The Villain in Robin Hood !!]....
The 7 mile Docks is the largest in the world....
The "£10 to Australia" offer started here....
St Johns Gardens has 82000 people buried there...
The world's only slavery museum is here.....
Charles Dickens was sworn in as a police officer here.....
Our most famous street used to be a fruit and veg market....
Our most famous club had no fire exit....and no alcohol licence...
We have the largest open air shopping centre in Europe......Welcome to Liverpool my fellow Summerwiners !!!!!.
Keith.
X!
I didn't know that Dickens was a policeman. That reminds me that I have a biography of him to read sometime.
 

WellyMan

Dedicated Member
I am from Newcastle so here a number of facts

Newcastle shares its latitude with Copenhagen, Denmark and southern Sweden.

The city is believed to be the coldest major city in England, but it is also one of the driest cities in the UK, due to being in the rain shadow of the North Pennines.

Newcastle Central Station was the first covered train station in the world and it was opened in 1850 by none other than Queen Victoria herself. Believe you or not, before that all passengers had to brave the elements while they waited for their train. The foundation stone is dated 1849 the date the High Level Bridge opened and allowed passengers to cross the river . Previously they got off the trains on the other bank and crossed by boat.

Newcastle was the filming location for 1971 gangster movie Get Carter and 1988 noir thriller Stormy Monday.

At 929 acres, Newcastle Town Moor is larger than most parks in London, including Hyde Park (363 acres) and Hampstead Heath (790 acres).

Mosley Street was the first street in the world to be illuminated by electric light.

Newcastle has seven bridges crossing the river in the space of half a mile. Tyne Bridge is said to have inspired Sydney Harbour Bridge in Australia; High Level Bridge was the first in the world to combine road and rail;

The Lit and Phil Library, formally known as the Literary and Philosophical Society of Newcastle upon Tyne, is the largest independent library outside London and it houses more than 150,000 books!

St James Park, the home of Newcastle United, is one of the oldest football stadiums in the UK and it is located right in the heart of the city.

At 73 miles long, Hadrian’s Wall is one of the largest Roman artefacts still standing today. It is also a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Newcastle Brown Ale is a proud produce of Newcastle, but it is also America’s most imported British Ale![Though its no longer brewed in the city]

Energy and sports drink Lucozade was invented in Newcastle by chemist William Owen.

Guitarist Jimi Hendrix was not only discovered by Geordie producer Chas Chandler, he also busked in Heaton Chillingham Road and had a Fish supper in Tynemouth.

George Stephenson, the ‘Father of Railways’, was a Geordie.

Originally a settlement called Pons Aelius, Newcastle was later named after the Roman fort that once stood at its centre.

RMS Carpathia, the boat that rescued Titanic survivors, was built in a River Tyne shipyard, in Newcastle.

The faithful windscreen wiper was invented in Newcastle by a Newcastle United fan as he drove home in a storm from a cup final match in 1908.

The city has its very own Vampire in the form of a Rabbit.

The North East has the greatest variety of ginger hair in the world! There are 47 shades of red hotness around the Tyne.


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I've never been to Newcastle, the nearest I've got is Sunderland many moons ago. But I do watch a YouTube vlog by a family who leave near Newcastle.
 

Adanor

Dedicated Member
I live in Fairfax County, Virginia (USA) which was formed in 1742 and named after Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron, the only member of the member of the British nobility to reside in the colonies on an estate called Belvoir Manor. The cousins, Lord Fairfax (Belvoir) and Lord Fairfax (Leeds Castle) wanted to be "in touch" with each other, so they both had special sundials made. One was set five hours ahead and the other was set five hours behind. The one in Belvoir, Virginia has been lost, but the one at Leeds Castle is still there; still reflecting a five hour difference.
 

WellyMan

Dedicated Member
Since I started this thread thought I'd list some things from my previous county of Wiltshire:

World famous site of Stonehenge
Devil's Den, Silbury Hill and various long barrows
Abandoned village of Imber on Salisbury Plain
One of the grottiest towns in England: Swindon
Swindon Mechanics Institute provided an early form of health service
 

Pearl

Administrator
Staff member
Well where I live yesterday I was working in the sunshine wearing my shorts and this morning I woke up to heavy snow. That’s fairly unusual for East Cheshire in Spring!
I think that is pretty standard in the UK at the moment, yesterday we had sunshine, snow, rain, hail and sleet.
 
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