Not Long to Go

Roger

Dedicated Member
I think the copyright lasts until the end of the calendar year of the first broadcast date so it will be 2024 for the first episodes and 2061 for the last.... but I could be wrong.
 

Roger

Dedicated Member
It means that you no longer need the BBC's permission to copy or broadcast the show. So all those LOTSW episodes on YouTube and Dailymotion are infringing the copyright. I remember a few years ago Dailymotion got fined over 1 million euros by a french court for copyright infringement and a lot of the videos had to be removed. YouTube argues that they are just hosting providers and it's up to their users that upload videos to check for copyright.
 

Eithne

Dedicated Member
Is it like when music enters public domain? It doesn't seem right when there are still people alive who worked on it. Would they no longer receive royalties?
 

BruceC

Dedicated Member
Your all assuming someone will pick up the show and 30+ years of episodes and run with them all - and if they do, will it be like other shows where they are NEVER played in order..
You'll see season 2 part 1 - then tomorrow season 52 part 5
 

Eithne

Dedicated Member
Where I am we already have that situation, I guess because the affiliate stations of PBS only purchase rights to show a patchwork of episodes. On streaming however, Britbox has seasons 1 through 8 for about $7 a month and IMdB TV (now freevee) has 8 through 20 something, or thereabouts, for free. It would be nice if the entire program could become available on freevee as a result of the copyright ending.
 

Eithne

Dedicated Member
@Eithne I'm fairly sure every episode from S1 to S22 or S23 are on Dailymotion and are clearly labeled so you can watch them for free on there.
Thanks, you know I always forget about Dailymotion, all you hear about here is YouTube, and on there, to get around the copyright issue they either tweak the sound, making the voices really off, or skew the picture in some way. I have several of the DVDs but its going to be a while before I can get them all and I'm not sure season 1 and 2 are available for my region. I'm not sure why DVD's have regions unless it's to prevent people from sending advance copies of new releases overseas.
In any case, thank you for reminding me about Dailymotion, there are still episodes in the later years I haven't seen yet!
 

Barrychuckle

Dedicated Member
Thanks, you know I always forget about Dailymotion, all you hear about here is YouTube, and on there, to get around the copyright issue they either tweak the sound, making the voices really off, or skew the picture in some way. I have several of the DVDs but its going to be a while before I can get them all and I'm not sure season 1 and 2 are available for my region. I'm not sure why DVD's have regions unless it's to prevent people from sending advance copies of new releases overseas.
In any case, thank you for reminding me about Dailymotion, there are still episodes in the later years I haven't seen yet!
Yes the ones on YouTube are unwatchable, I've just checked and they're pretty much all on DM in near perfect quality. Happy Viewing!

 

Pearl

Administrator
Staff member
That's interesting, I'd like to see it picked up by a station that doesn't show adverts but ( for now ) that's only the BBC. I'd like to think maybe Netflix or similar would pick it up. Like Wstol asked would that mean the entire 30 years worth or just the older ones?
 

Sarkus

Dedicated Member
I guess the question I would have is whether older shows in the UK have actually passed into the public domain. Dad's Army, for example, started earlier so would already be free and clear if its as simple as 50 years after the broadcast of the very first episode. So, is that the case?
 

Eithne

Dedicated Member
Any reason to have it on TV full of ads, when most people here seem to have em on DVD ?
The most obvious reason is to ensure that the show is available to new people who have not had the opportunity to view it before. Another is that every time LOTSW or a show like it airs it is a victory in the battle for the continued existence of whole family entertainment.

No one like commercials, but they do serve a purpose. Mainly they are convenient breaks to run to the bathroom or get a snack, but they do actually pay the bills for the tv stations and the media distributers, etc. and often, especially in the case of PBS and the like, they sponsor shows specifically, ensuring that they continue to air.

When I was young, like most here, there was no binge watching of shows, or VCRs. When your favorite show came on at 7:30 Thursday you darn well had to wait until next Thursday 7:30 for the next episode and hope nothing blew up or the President didn't decide to have something to say that evening, because if you missed it, it was gone forever. It felt like eternity waiting. I think that those who have more easily adapted to the concept "yeah, I have it on DVD, I can watch it whenever." or don't remember a time when they did not have that luxury, can't fully appreciate the feeling of watching it "live", even though cognitively we know in this case it isn't live, it was 50 years ago. Somehow you are aware that when you watch it on the air you aren't watching it alone. That can be a very important feeling for people who, because of age or circumstances have no choice but to spend more time alone than would be good for them.
There is something very pleasing in knowing that other people are watching and discovering and enjoying a show you love. That you have something in common with your fellow beings on this earth even if you never meet them. It almost restores hope in humanity.
 

maltrab

Administrator
Staff member
That's interesting, I'd like to see it picked up by a station that doesn't show adverts but ( for now ) that's only the BBC. I'd like to think maybe Netflix or similar would pick it up. Like Wstol asked would that mean the entire 30 years worth or just the older ones?
Just the one from 50 years old at Broadcast date,so it would be 2070 before they are all out of Copyright
 
Top