Annual behind-the-desk tidy

Adanor

Well-Known Member
This is what it should look like, though I don't know how long it will look this tidy :08:
Since you're a coder, you can confidently unplug and plug everything back in. I, on the other hand, would definitely screw everything up. And my computer repair guys always assume that I have a laptop. Just bring it in, they say. Then I say, Send someone by, it's a desktop. And then we have this Zoom issue, which I am still working on. And yes, using a black dial phone is in my memory bank. And my head spins with all these new names suddenly being thrown around -- Snapshot, Facetime, Facebook and on and on. And they're used like I'm supposed to know about them. Next thing you'll know, I'll walk into the Smithsonian and encounter a payphone -- on display.
 

Marianna

Well-Known Member
Since you're a coder, you can confidently unplug and plug everything back in.
I pull the CPU out so I can see the back, then take a photo of it, print the photo, then label everything. Then I unplug and laboriously schlep the tower into the car to take it to the repair shop. The last CPU I worked on was the IBM PS/2, so I'm hopelessly out of date.
 

maltrab

Administrator
Staff member
He has been shopping in Argos again, they are two Tiny brand computers from the 80's with apple stickers on them
tiny.jpg
 

captain clutterbuck

Well-Known Member
I worked in Data Centre networks often spent time troubleshooting connectivity issues aside from routing problems cable issues were the biggest problem and the bane of my life , patching records are critical . Cable testers are a great help but often in the older centres records were sparse and a lot of cabling was sub floor so no choice but to lift the floor tiles and get under there , god help you if you are claustrophobic . :13:
 

maltrab

Administrator
Staff member
I have been is some Data centres that you could eat off the floor and were works of art, others looked like a bowl of spaghetti
 

captain clutterbuck

Well-Known Member
the older ones in our chain of Data Centres did look like that but as old switching/hub structure went we used cabling in such a manner that it was unbelievably neat. For all accounts we used to have all switch ports hard wired by a cabling company and presented as a series of panels in switch patching racks and then for each server rack we had panel to panel links from server rack to those switching panel racks . The server teams would then patch from server to panel in predetermined ports on the panel and we would patch from the server at the switch patching panel end to the equivalent panel port at that end to the one used by the server , accurate patching records were recorded electronically to allow easy diagnose if issues occurred .

We had a company permanently on site installing these panels to panel links and switch to panel links , they also provided patching cables , god knows how much that company earned in business from my company must have been well into the millions but it was a really ground breaking neat solution and basically de-risked any chance of bringing down a switch by any of our team because we never went anywhere near them just the panel presentation for each of the ports . We of course could control the introduction of new servers onto the network by our configuration on the switches/routers and of course we would get logged alerts if ports went down and owing to our records it was so easy to trace the connections through . Do I miss it all , not on your Nelly !! :)
 
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