First of the Summer Wine scenes shot in Huddersfield

Marianna

Well-Known Member
#1
Was browsing http://johnnyshistory.com/index.html looking for an update, as I usually stay at the Central Lodge when I'm in the area and John mentioned last October that they had put it on the market. No update, but in the section titled "First and Last of the Summer Wine" there's a mention of "First ..." having been filmed, in part, in Tomlinson's Yard. Does anyone know which scenes? I looked down into the Yard on Google Earth, but didn't see anything that I recognized from either set of DVDs.
 

maltrab

Administrator
Staff member
#2
My daughter is in Uni just around the corner and I have asked her could she take some pictures inside the yard,it may help,Terry
 

Marianna

Well-Known Member
#3
Thanks, Terry.

It'll be interesting to see what's in there from a better perspective than the free download version of Google Earth zoomed to just before street view.

Marianna
 

Marianna

Well-Known Member
#5
You are probably aware that many of the cast used to stay at The Central Lodge when they were filming
Oh, yes! When John Marsden found that I was in Huddersfield for the easy bus connection to Holmfirth, among other things, he told me all about it. Along with everyone else I talk with in the UK, he was curious about why an American tourist was staying in Huddersfield. In addition to Holmfirth, there's the attraction of the Standedge Canal tunnel and all the industrial history of the region.
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
#6
Where are you upstate? We lived in the Kingston/Saugerties
area many many years ago.

And why stay in Huddersfield when you can easily stay
in Holmfirth with bus connection to Marsden and
easy walking to Jackson Bridge?? I find Huddersfield too
busy.

We will be in Nora's cottage Saturday for a week!!
 

Marianna

Well-Known Member
#7
We will be in Nora's cottage Saturday for a week!!
Lucky you!

I live near Corning. People from more heavily populated areas find this area restful, but I find it dull.

For me, Hudderfield's busy character reads as vitality, and I enjoy it. I stay in Huddersfield partly because I hate carrying luggage on local buses. There just isn't the space, the way there is on London buses (as long as the wheelchair/pram area isn't filled with wheelchairs and/or prams). In addition, I go to that area for much more than Summer Wine. There's also the narrow canal and other evidence of West Yorkshire industrial history, the restored Standedge Tunnel and the scenic Summer Wine locations in the hills above it, as well as the interesting little Colne Valley Museum in Golcar. Last, but not least, there are my friends in the area and the ease of meeting up for conversation and really good food at The Keys, the cafe in the Huddersfield Parish Church crypt.
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
#8
We get a direct flight from RDU to London, and then drive
straight north up the M1. Should be in the Elephant and
Castle just after noon for a pint. So we always have a rental car
while there.

We do sometimes take the bus, but bus service
seems to be slipping a bit. Besides, we do better in the car
when visiting places like Tan Hill and the smaller Dales
villages.

This year we are firmly fixed on visiting the scenes
of Heartbeat and The Royal, two more favorite UK shows.
Really want to see Gina's Aidensfield Arms pub.
 

Marianna

Well-Known Member
#9
This year we are firmly fixed on visiting the scenes of Heartbeat and The Royal, two more favorite UK shows.
Really want to see Gina's Aidensfield Arms pub.
I haven't seen either of those two shows, but the itinerary sounds like fun.

I hate driving, and there's almost no public transportation in this area, so even though rail service in the UK has deteriorated noticeably since privatization and local bus service to the smaller hamlets can be infrequent, it's still a treat for me to get around by rail and local buses. I doubt if I'll ever rent a car in the UK. Most of the places I want to see are within a couple of miles walking from the rail station or bus stop, I need the exercise and I see more on foot than on wheels.
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
#10
We still do some walking, but I have you by a year or so
and I can begin to slow down.

We will walk from Holmfirth to Jackson Bridge, stopping at
the Boot and Shoe in Scholes, then the White Horse in
Jackson Bridge, then the Butcher's Arms in Hepworth, then
back thru the Boot and Shoe to Wooldale for the Wooldale
Arms, then back into Holmfirth. Some many miles and
several ales.

We will also drive to villages like Marsden, Dent, Garsdale,
Sedbergh etc just to walk about looking for pubs. Then drive
to the Hawes area for long walks in the Dales.

Gotta go pack now, as we leave tomorrow!!!
 

Marianna

Well-Known Member
#13
Here are the Tomlinson's Yard Pictures as Promised. Terry
Thanks. And please thank your daughter, as well. She must have taken time from her studies to run this errand.

Next time I watch First of the Summer Wine, I'll have those photos at hand for reference.

Marianna
 

chris

Well-Known Member
#14
Glad you both enjoy your visits to the UK ,I don't agree about the comment that our train services have deterorated since privatisation overall they are better and being used by far more people than in BR days.Get yourself a Brit Rail pass its well worth the money and you will enjoy your travels .Shame they don't have trolleybuses in Huddersfield now.:17:
 

Marianna

Well-Known Member
#15
chris;163677I don't agree about the comment that our train services have deterorated since privatisation overall they are better and being used by far more people than in BR days.Get yourself a Brit Rail pass its well worth the money and you will enjoy your travels.[/QUOTE said:
Now that I think more about it, the Beeching Axe, long before my traveling days, caused the worst of the rail service deterioration by closing the lines to so many smaller towns, like Holmfirth, Bourton-on-the-Water and Coniston. All of those are towns that would be much easier to visit if they had rail service, rather than having to take a bus from Huddersfield, Moreton-in-Marsh and Windermere.

I have a Senior Railcard and the discounts are very good. I tend to stay in the UK for no longer than a month per trip and I like to settle into lodgings for at least a week at a time with day excursions to nearby places, usually ones with no rail service. A Brit Rail pass appears to work better for folks who relocate every few days.

Marianna
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
#16
Curious. Do you favor B&Bs, self-caterings, or something else?

We have recently switched from B&Bs to self-catering as we can
no longer consume the full English Brekky. And my wife likes
to cook as well. We have breakfast in. For dinner we alternate
between a pub and home-cooking, taking advantage of the
wonderful UK sausages and lamb cuts that we don't get at home.
Especially in Hawes where we stay across the road from the
Butcher and Baker.

chuck
 

Marianna

Well-Known Member
#17
Hi Chuck

I prefer B&Bs for independent travel, partly because I don't like to cook - I get more than enough of it at home. Breakfast is one of the joys of any stay in the UK for me, although I don't order all of it. Just various parts - how many and which ones depend on how hungry I am.

Usually, I have my big, hot meal at lunch time, with gleanings from a deli or similar retailer for dinner. Sainsbury's and Marks & Spencer's Simply Food have good take-away selections, but the best I've found so far is Pret A Manger.

In London, I strongly prefer Passfield Hall, the LSE dorm at the north end of Bloomsbury. When classes aren't in session, it becomes a B&B, and it has amenities not usually available in B&Bs like a lift and on-site laundrette. The building has loads of character and the location can't be beat. I usually spring for one of their en-suite rooms, but they have to be booked as soon as the new season becomes available. I'll be there for several nights in mid-September while I do some genealogy research at the British Museum.

For the "organized holiday" part of each trip, for the last 20 years or so I've stuck with HF Holidays. Their country house hotels are great, with laundry facilities, a bar and free wi-fi at least in the public rooms and usually in the guest rooms, as well. No lift, but the staff is happy to help with luggage. The holidays are full board with varied, tasty and plentiful food. The holiday content is wonderful, too - lots of different topics, as well as the walking that they're known for. In September/October I'm spending a week at one of the North Wales houses (Beddgelert) for landscape photography and a week at the Derbyshire house (Thorpe) for industrial history.

Marianna
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
#18
Marianna, you do a level or so above our trips. Where
we stay there are generally not much above a Co-op
(Holmfirth) or a SPAR (Hawes). We buy meats and baked
goods at the local butcher and baker, and fresh eggs
at farms along the roads. We generally do not do actual
restaurants, but do use local pubs often. In Holmfirth
we really love spending time at The Nook where the do
wonderful burgers and brew their own ales. In Hawes it's
the Crown or the Fountain usually. We also like to walk to
a village, do the pub, and then walk back. From Hawes we
often walk up to Hardraw to the Green Dragon for a glass.

chuck
 

Marianna

Well-Known Member
#19
We generally do not do actual restaurants, but do use local pubs often.
Hi Chuck,

My hot noon meal is a pub lunch if there's a pub nearby at lunch time. I haven't had any alcohol in such a long time that even just a half would probably put me under the table, and by dinner time I'm too tired to sit up an act civilized so I'm better off eating snacks in my room for dinner.

On the HF holidays, lunch is a picnic consisting of the sandwich(s) ordered the previous evening and a selection from the many items set out in the morning with the freshly-made sandwiches. I have to pull myself together for dinner or the house staff and the people in my group would worry.

Marianna
 
#20
Envy you both, I make notes on where this info is and date for me to look up when someday I will make the trip. I WILL someday! How many times have you been over there Marianna? Over 20?:wink:
 
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